Loudoun duo playing professional soccer for Washington Spirit

DiDi Haracic Whitney Church

In a lot of ways, Whitney Church and DiDi Haracic’s involvement in soccer isn’t too uncommon from others.

Around the age of 5, they first started playing the sport. Just a few short years later when they became old enough, they started playing travel. Then it was high school and college soccer later on after that.

But it’s that one final level that comes next that largely separates the two from the rest.

Both Church and Haracic are now playing professionally for the Washington Spirit of the National Women’s Soccer League – and they came to reach that point as lifelong Loudoun County residents and longtime friends.

“It’s funny, we actually played on the same club team growing up,” Haracic said. “We played for Loudoun (Soccer) together.”

And it’s through that where much of their story begins.

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Privacy in a public space: Where are the boundaries?

University of Missouri student photographer Tim Tai was forcibly prevented from taking photos on the school's quad after protests involving racial concerns broke out. (Mark Schierbecker/YouTube)
University of Missouri student photographer Tim Tai was forcibly prevented from taking photos on the school’s quad after protests broke out. (Mark Schierbecker/YouTube)

**Also by Layton Dudley**

This post was originally published on my JN 499 class blog at The University of Alabama, a course dealing with journalism ethics: https://uajn499.wordpress.com/2015/12/08/privacy-in-a-public-space-where-are-the-boundaries/

Prezi: https://prezi.com/5u2bogtnfi-j/ethics-mizzou-student-protest/

***

Alec Lewis was a little late to the party on the day that changed the landscape of the University of Missouri forever.

On that morning, Monday, Nov. 9, then-University of Missouri system president Tim Wolfe stepped down from his position, presumably bringing an end to the student-led protests that called for his resignation over his handling of racial unrest at the university.

But while perhaps their biggest demand of all had finally been met months after their initial protests began and helped bring an end to one student’s weeklong hunger strike, it didn’t all just come to an immediate halt.

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Responsibility key when advocating in the media

This post was originally published on my JN 499 class blog at The University of Alabama, a course dealing with journalism ethics: https://uajn499.wordpress.com/2015/11/10/responsibility-key-when-advocating-in-the-media/

It was then later published on DoingEthicsInMedia.com, the website for the “Doing Ethics in Media: Theories and Practical Applications” textbook used for the course: http://www.doingethicsinmedia.com/wp/nfls-greg-hardy-photos-require-journalistic-responsibility-when-advocating/

***

For many, the images were the final straw.

Eighteen months after Greg Hardy was arrested – and later convicted – on domestic violence charges, the photos showing the injuries he allegedly inflicted on former girlfriend Nicole Holder came to light.

In the 47 photos released by Deadspin last Friday, 45 show Holder bruised from her foot up to her chin, which she testified in July 2014 as Hardy’s doing.

And while it hardly came as a surprise to anyone who saw them, it just reached some people’s breaking point, including ESPN’s Wendi Nix.

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Sexism still an issue in sports journalism in 2015

Mike Bell Jessica Mendoza
(Photo Credit: Twitter)

This post was originally published on my JN 499 class blog at The University of Alabama, a course dealing with journalism ethics: https://uajn499.wordpress.com/2015/10/20/sexism-still-an-issue-in-sports-journalism-in-2015/

It was then later published on DoingEthicsInMedia.com, the website for the “Doing Ethics in Media: Theories and Practical Applications” textbook used for the course: http://www.doingethicsinmedia.com/wp/sexism-remains-an-issue-in-sports-journalism-in-2015/

***

If you think you have it better off than me, there’s a good chance you’re wrong.

Ask yourself, are you a male? Yes? No? If it’s the latter, then I don’t think it’s up for discussion.

While I could probably use this test in most areas of our masculine culture and get the same result nine times out of 10, it seems clear to me that it especially holds true in a field I know quite well – journalism.

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Sports journalism and fandom: Can they coexist?

Mark Schlereth
(@markschlereth/Twitter)

This post was originally published on my JN 499 class blog at The University of Alabama, a course dealing with journalism ethics: https://uajn499.wordpress.com/2015/10/06/sports-journalism-and-fandom-can-they-coexist/

***

When you’re a journalist, the first thing you usually do when you get to a stadium is pick up your media credential.

With that credential – a small pass on a lanyard with your name and organization usually written on it – you’re given access to the press box, the field and the interviews held immediately after the game.

But before you even get that far, before you pick up your media credential outside the venue, there’s one other thing you need to do first:

Turn in your fan card.

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Defamation after death: Is it fair game?

This post was originally published on my JN 499 class blog at The University of Alabama, a course dealing with journalism ethics: https://uajn499.wordpress.com/2015/09/15/defamation-after-death-is-it-fair-game/

It was then later published on DoingEthicsInMedia.com, the website for the “Doing Ethics in Media: Theories and Practical Applications” textbook used for the course: http://www.doingethicsinmedia.com/wp/its-legal-to-defame-a-dead-person-but-that-does-not-make-it-ethical/

***

When Vladlen Putistin took his case to court, his claim was clear: He wanted the information rectified and he wanted compensation for the damages. In his view, he believed the journalist’s statements in her published newspaper article defamed his father, thus justifying his decision to sue.

In July 2001, Putistin sued the newspaper Komsomolska Pravda and its journalist on the grounds that an article published three months earlier was harmful to the reputation of his father, Mikhail. Putistin claimed that the article, titled “The Truth about the Death Match,” an infamous soccer match played in Kiev – then a part of the Soviet Union – between former professional soccer players and German military personnel in 1942 during the midst of World War II, suggested Mikhail, a Soviet, was a Nazi collaborator.

But there’s a catch: His father was dead before the article was ever published.

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WDBJ shooting videos raise questions about graphic content

Alison Parker and Adam Ward

This post was originally published on my JN 499 class blog at The University of Alabama, a course dealing with journalism ethics: https://uajn499.wordpress.com/2015/09/02/wdbj-shooting-videos-raise-questions-about-graphic-content/

***

He got his way, and the media helped make sure of that.

If, by chance, you were anywhere near a television, phone or computer, the story – and more importantly the video – was next to impossible to miss.

Alison Parker, 24, and her cameraman, Adam Ward, 27, of WDBJ, a CBS-affiliated television station based in Roanoke, Virginia, were murdered on live television last Wednesday, and the whole world got to see it unfold.

Just how the shooter planned it.

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‘O Unlucky Man: Fortune never smiled on Sonny Liston’ Analysis

 

William Nack’s “O Unlucky Man” piece on one-time heavyweight champion Sonny Liston is one of the greatest stories to ever grace the pages of Sports Illustrated for many reasons.

For starters, it’s a big project, going back in time about a man who many might agree had been lost in history. It has a lede so captivating that the reader is on the edge of their seats by the time they finish the first paragraph. And it elicits an emotional response, where, by the end of it, the reader is left reflecting on life after enduring a mix of feelings including sorrow, anger and doubt.

Who was Sonny Liston? Nack takes a long, hard look to find out.

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‘Inside the mind of John Elway’ Analysis

Here’s the thing about John Elway: you already know everything there is to say about him as the superstar quarterback. The well went dry on anecdotes and tidbits from his playing days a long time ago, because of his stature.

Everyone knows about his story as that guy who couldn’t win a Super Bowl for so long before finally getting his fairytale moment with back-to-back titles to end his career. Who doesn’t? Even people like me who weren’t old enough to actually remember those last two Super Bowl runs could give you the summary of his playing career. (The fact that I had a 1998 Super Bowl XXXII pennant hanging on my bedroom wall growing up for some reason probably helped, even though I was never a Denver Broncos fan.)

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‘In Giannis We Trust’ and Matt Finkes Analysis

One of my biggest pet peeves of sports journalism is, what I like to call, a lazy profile. Every now and again, I come across an 1,000-word piece or so about an athlete, giving me nothing more than information found on Wikipedia, complemented by uninteresting block quotes. I don’t mean to sound condescending, but I know I like to see some real on-the-ground reporting, touched up with a unique and obvious style in the final product, especially in featured profiles.

A good example of the latter is Amos Barshad’s story on Giannis Antetokounmpo, also known as the “Greek Freak.” Antetokounmpo is from Greece, he’s insanely athletic and he’s a pretty good young basketball player on the rise – that we know.

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