Sexism still an issue in sports journalism in 2015

Mike Bell Jessica Mendoza
(Photo Credit: Twitter)

This post was originally published on my JN 499 class blog at The University of Alabama, a course dealing with journalism ethics: https://uajn499.wordpress.com/2015/10/20/sexism-still-an-issue-in-sports-journalism-in-2015/

It was then later published on DoingEthicsInMedia.com, the website for the “Doing Ethics in Media: Theories and Practical Applications” textbook used for the course: http://www.doingethicsinmedia.com/wp/sexism-remains-an-issue-in-sports-journalism-in-2015/

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If you think you have it better off than me, there’s a good chance you’re wrong.

Ask yourself, are you a male? Yes? No? If it’s the latter, then I don’t think it’s up for discussion.

While I could probably use this test in most areas of our masculine culture and get the same result nine times out of 10, it seems clear to me that it especially holds true in a field I know quite well – journalism.

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Sports journalism and fandom: Can they coexist?

Mark Schlereth
(@markschlereth/Twitter)

This post was originally published on my JN 499 class blog at The University of Alabama, a course dealing with journalism ethics: https://uajn499.wordpress.com/2015/10/06/sports-journalism-and-fandom-can-they-coexist/

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When you’re a journalist, the first thing you usually do when you get to a stadium is pick up your media credential.

With that credential – a small pass on a lanyard with your name and organization usually written on it – you’re given access to the press box, the field and the interviews held immediately after the game.

But before you even get that far, before you pick up your media credential outside the venue, there’s one other thing you need to do first:

Turn in your fan card.

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